Standing Orders and Office Orders

Jun 23, 2022 | Blog, Organisation & governance, Processes by-passed, Self Governance

Standing orders are usually seen to be used in Banks and Post Offices in the Indian Union, and usually have something to do with money.

In the Auroville context, even though the name is highly irregular, a Standing Order may be seen as an Administrative Order. An administrative order is basically an order of an authority prescribing a particular procedure that shall be followed to fulfill a certain duty that it has the authority to perform. [A Government Order (GO) is also an example of an Administrative Order.]

In Auroville, the two authorities fulfill their duties through admininstrative orders:

– the Governing Board (GB) calls their orders as ‘Standing Orders’ and the Residents’ Assembly calls their orders as ‘Resolutions’.

– The Residents Assembly (RA) has many types of Resolutions, namely RADs (Residents Assembly Decisions) and selection resolutions. It can also create any type of resolutions under its powers and functions.

Standing Orders are issued by the Secretary and Resolutions are issued by the RAS.

An Office order, on the other hand, is a legalisation of a particular decision made by one of the authorities, namely the RA or the GB.

An office order does not prescribe any procedure but only shows notice of a certain decision taken by the relevant authority of the Foundation.

An Office Order can only be made on direction from RA or the GB, or both, and not without.

If the RA wants an Office Order issued, all it has to do is direct the Secretary to do so, after consulting the GB (other than for decisions that are solely in its own juridiction), through its Working Committee (WCom).

If the GB wants to issue an Office  Order, all it has to do is direct the Secretary to do so, after consulting the RA (other than for decisions that are solely in its own juridiction), to get an Office Order passed. (other than for decisions that are solely in its own juridiction)

All the three types of orders, Office Orders, Standing Orders as well as Resolutions (of any type) should usually have a preamble which explains the source of power* through which the said Order has been passed, as well as be signed and stamped by the authority, in some form.

* for example which para , article of the Foundation Act 1988 it refers to

The Auroville Foundation Act : https://standforaurovilleunity.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/12/AV-Foundation-Act-1988.pdf

To understand Auroville organisation:https://standforaurovilleunity.com/auroville-organisation/